Boehner (wisely) calls Obama’s bluff

The Ohio Republican, along with Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.), will introduce legislation on Wednesday to reauthorize the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship program, the speaker’s office said Monday, making a school voucher initiative that Democrats, including Obama, have strongly opposed as a bargaining chip for beginning discussions on the administration’s desired education proposals. … Teachers unions have fought against the voucher program and Obama’s budget pulled funding for new scholarships after 2010. Supporters of the program, which currently funds scholarships for roughly 1,000 D.C. students, argue that it gives poor students access to better education. De-funding the program would return many of  those students…

barack w. obama

When it comes to eliminating earmarks, Obama’s no better than his predecessor, the self-proclaimed “reformer with results.” “We need earmark reform and when I’m president, I will go line by line to make sure we’re not spending money unwisely,” McCain said, reading back Obama’s words at a debate last fall. “That’s the quote, the promise of the president of the United States made to the American people in a debate with me in Oxford, Miss. So what is brought to the floor today — 9,000 earmarks.…So much for change.” (And so much for the Politico headline: Angry McCain Slams Obama. We should…

what if michael bloomberg had run?

The New York mayor seriously considered a third-party candidacy last winter. Too bad he didn’t pursue it. Considering the current financial crisis, who do you think voters would turn to? The candidate with little experience, the one tethered to George Herbert Walker Hoover or the pragmatic innovator and self-made billionaire? Beyond his business acumen, Michael Bloomberg could’ve made the most credible case for reform. The drama over the bailout plan demonstrated once again that neither party can be trusted to lead. Resentment towards the two parties has been building for years, and it’s never been greater. I voted for Ross Perot in…

on reform, obama says one thing, does another

And no amount of *caveats will change the facts: Obama in Nov. 2007: He answered “Yes” to Common Cause when asked “If you are nominated for President in 2008 and your major opponents agree to forgo private funding in the general election campaign, will you participate in the presidential public financing system?” Obama today: “We’ve made the decision not to participate in the public financing system for the general election,” Obama says in the video, blaming it on the need to combat Republicans, saying “we face opponents who’ve become masters at gaming this broken system. John McCain’s campaign and the Republican National…