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The real dividers

President Obama has been criticized for rarely engaging the county on matters of race but, seeing the nasty reaction from GOP presidential candidates to his benign comments on the Trayvon Martin case, it’s easy to understand why he tends to abstain.

“Is the president suggesting if it had been a white who had been shot, that would be OK because it wouldn’t look like him?” Gingrich said Friday on Sean Hannity’s radio show. “That’s just nonsense. I mean, dividing this country up, it is a tragedy this young man was shot.”

In a separate radio interview Friday, Santorum had a similar reaction.

“What the president of the United States should do is try to bring people together, not use these types of horrible and tragic individual cases to try to drive a wedge in America,” Santorum said.

And they wonder why the GOP has trouble attracting black voters.

The question the GOP fears most

Which Candidate Would You Rather Have a Beer With?

We hear this question every election, though, for me, there’s never been an obvious answer (save for Bob Dole).

I dare you to find one person who’d choose to down a cold one with Romney or Santorum. The Anchorman would try to assure you that, even though he doesn’t personally know any beer drinkers, he once met August Busch at a party at Adolph Coors’ estate. Meanwhile, Santorum would scream Bible verses at you about the evils of alcohol.

If you’re not embarrassed by Rick Santorum you’re an embarrassment

Father Santorum plays to the crowd.

Rick Santorum took a swipe at the president’s higher education push on Saturday.

“President Obama once said he wants everybody in America to go to college,” Santorum said. “What a snob.”

The GOP candidate was speaking to a crowd of Tea Party activists in Troy, Michigan.

Rick Santorum and Nazis

He’s quite fond of comparing political opponents to the Third Reich, as Dana Milbank points out:

His most famous episode came in 2005, when Democrats criticized Senate Republicans for threatening to do away with the filibuster. “The audacity of some members to stand up and say, ‘How dare you break this rule?’ — it’s the equivalent of Adolf Hitler in 1942 saying, ‘I’m in Paris. How dare you invade me? How dare you bomb my city? It’s mine.’ ”

That same year, Santorum published a book, “It Takes a Family,” in which he tied fetal genetic testing, evolution theory and embryonic stem-cell research to Nazism. He quoted with approval the view that diagnosing and aborting fetuses with genetic malformations “can be considered an earlier phase” of the “German negative eugenics movement.”

Of the Darwinian view of a “purposeless universe,” Santorum wrote that “the Nazis built their pseudoethics with its grim logic on precisely this Nietzschean cosmological view.” Embryonic stem-cell research, he added, makes him “wonder if we have merely been momentarily delayed in our slide” toward the Nazi ethics.

The Nazi comparison is typically the first refuge of an extremist.

Why does Sarah Palin speak like a third grader?

The idiot Palin’s response to Rick Santorum’s views on Satan “setting his sights on America” are predictably childish.

And for these lame-stream media characters to get all wee-weed up about that, first you have to ask yourself, ‘Have they ever attended a Sunday school class even?

Worse, she thinks she’s clever.

Rick Santorum not so fundamentalist about tithing

Father Santorum adheres to fundamentalist Catholic dogma on issues like contraception but, when it comes to giving, he falls well short of the Biblical mandate to tithe 10 percent of your earnings.

 In no year was charitable giving more than 3 percent of his income, and he dipped below 2 percent in one year.

As Jennifer Rubin notes, “so much of Santorum’s career and a good deal of his writing focus on faith-based charities. So why did he personally give so little to the groups he lauds?”

Conservative conspiracy du jour

Rush Limbaugh says Rick Santorum is the victim of a liberal conspiracy merely because Democrats are using the fundamentalist Christian’s words against him.

“The whole point of this contraception stuff [that] started last week is to make sure that if Santorum get this Republican nomination, that’s what he’s going to be known for, and of course the theme of that is: Santorum hates women, Republicans hate women, Republicans have no respect for women,” the conservative radio host said on his show. “Republicans want women in the kitchen constantly pregnant, blah, blah, whatever it is.”

No one’s saying Santorum hates women, merely that he thinks they should be ruled by his own fundamentalist beliefs.

Face it, conservatives, you may well be nominating a candidate who wants to build a bridge to the 1950s. Deal with the consequences.