have they forgotten?

hazing
Who put them in charge? Dick Cheney

Those yearning for a third term by Dick Cheney must be sadists or masochists. Or both. If Cheney had indeed been calling the shots, we’d be mired in THREE quagmires.

*Afghanistan. Call it Obama’s war all you want, but the only thing he’s done differently in nine months (compared to the seven years the previous administration was in charge) is add more troops. The Cheney Plan privatized our national security, and isn’t that working out splendidly?

*Iraq. Cheney initially opposed the troop surge; his support of the troop-lite Rumsfeld fantasy facilitated it.

*Iran. Cheney supported a preemptive strike. That would’ve neutered the ongoing revolution in that country. Iranians, like Americans after 9/11, would’ve likely rallied around their president.

So, feel any safer?

sacrelicious

Shameless
Shameless
Significant ammo for those who think Bush, while in charge and ultimately responsible, was a useful dupe:

[Donald Rumsfeld] gave President George Bush secret intelligence briefs headlined with biblical quotations, in a bid to boost his standing with the deeply religious president but one that risked sparking a conflagration in the Muslim world if the papers leaked. …

The previously unreleased documents are a shocking and unusual admixture of the two realms. The cover of one intelligence briefing shows US soldiers kneeling in prayer, headlined with a selection from the book of Isaiah: “Whom shall I send, and who will go for us?/ Here I am Lord, send me!” The same page is covered with the classification codes and handling instructions typical to secret US government documents.

Other cover sheets released by the magazine feature images of US military vehicles and troops trudging through desert landscapes, manning a machine gun emplacement, and US soldiers inside what appears to be a posh palace once belonging to Saddam Hussein. One shows an image of Saddam speaking into a television camera and quotes 1 Peter 2:15: “It is God’s will that by doing good you should silence the ignorant talk of foolish men.”

And yet Rummy remains a folk hero to the right.

bush administration (sorta) acknowledges incompetence, arrogance

Convenient, now that no one’s paying attention.

Item One:

Paul Wolfowitz, in his first public remarks on the Iraq war in years, said the American government was “pretty much clueless on counterinsurgency” in the first year of the war. …

Mr. Wolfowitz said no one in the Bush administration anticipated that Saddam would order his security services to wage an insurgency after their formal defeat on the battlefield.

Gee, I had no idea the mob would retaliate just because I stole their money and fucked their goomah.

Item Two:

The White House said Wednesday that the “Mission Accomplished” banner displayed behind the president during his carefully managed celebration and media event was a mistake.

The president is “well aware that the banner should have been much more specific and said `mission accomplished’ for these sailors who are on this ship on their mission,” White House press secretary Dana Perino said Wednesday. “And we have certainly paid a price for not being more specific on that banner.”

Of course, that would’ve called for one mighty big banner, and you know how this administration doesn’t like to waste money.

The White House official in charge of sloganeering is also being blamed for feeding Dick Cheney the line about “the last throes of the insurgency.” June 20th will mark the third anniversary of that pronouncement.

Good News From Baghdad

No matter your thoughts on the war, every American should welcome this news:

The security improvements in most neighborhoods are real. Days now pass without a car bomb, after a high of 44 in the city in February. The number of bodies appearing on Baghdad’s streets has plummeted to about 5 a day, from as many as 35 eight months ago, and suicide bombings across Iraq fell to 16 in October, half the number of last summer and down sharply from a recent peak of 59 in March, the American military says.

As a result, for the first time in nearly two years, people are moving with freedom around much of this city. In more than 50 interviews across Baghdad, it became clear that while there were still no-go zones, more Iraqis now drive between Sunni and Shiite areas for work, shopping or school, a few even after dark. In the most stable neighborhoods of Baghdad, some secular women are also dressing as they wish. Wedding bands are playing in public again, and at a handful of once shuttered liquor stores customers now line up outside in a collective rebuke to religious vigilantes from the Shiite Mahdi Army.

Questions remain, of course. Will this return to nomalcy outlast the surge? Once the troops leave, will Baghdad descend back into chaos?

Good News From Baghdad

No matter your thoughts on the war, every American should welcome this news:

The security improvements in most neighborhoods are real. Days now pass without a car bomb, after a high of 44 in the city in February. The number of bodies appearing on Baghdad’s streets has plummeted to about 5 a day, from as many as 35 eight months ago, and suicide bombings across Iraq fell to 16 in October, half the number of last summer and down sharply from a recent peak of 59 in March, the American military says.

As a result, for the first time in nearly two years, people are moving with freedom around much of this city. In more than 50 interviews across Baghdad, it became clear that while there were still no-go zones, more Iraqis now drive between Sunni and Shiite areas for work, shopping or school, a few even after dark. In the most stable neighborhoods of Baghdad, some secular women are also dressing as they wish. Wedding bands are playing in public again, and at a handful of once shuttered liquor stores customers now line up outside in a collective rebuke to religious vigilantes from the Shiite Mahdi Army.

Questions remain, of course. Will this return to nomalcy outlast the surge? Once the troops leave, will Baghdad descend back into chaos?

Good News From Baghdad

No matter your thoughts on the war, every American should welcome this news:

The security improvements in most neighborhoods are real. Days now pass without a car bomb, after a high of 44 in the city in February. The number of bodies appearing on Baghdad’s streets has plummeted to about 5 a day, from as many as 35 eight months ago, and suicide bombings across Iraq fell to 16 in October, half the number of last summer and down sharply from a recent peak of 59 in March, the American military says.

As a result, for the first time in nearly two years, people are moving with freedom around much of this city. In more than 50 interviews across Baghdad, it became clear that while there were still no-go zones, more Iraqis now drive between Sunni and Shiite areas for work, shopping or school, a few even after dark. In the most stable neighborhoods of Baghdad, some secular women are also dressing as they wish. Wedding bands are playing in public again, and at a handful of once shuttered liquor stores customers now line up outside in a collective rebuke to religious vigilantes from the Shiite Mahdi Army.

Questions remain, of course. Will this return to nomalcy outlast the surge? Once the troops leave, will Baghdad descend back into chaos?

Good News From Baghdad

No matter your thoughts on the war, every American should welcome this news:

The security improvements in most neighborhoods are real. Days now pass without a car bomb, after a high of 44 in the city in February. The number of bodies appearing on Baghdad’s streets has plummeted to about 5 a day, from as many as 35 eight months ago, and suicide bombings across Iraq fell to 16 in October, half the number of last summer and down sharply from a recent peak of 59 in March, the American military says.

As a result, for the first time in nearly two years, people are moving with freedom around much of this city. In more than 50 interviews across Baghdad, it became clear that while there were still no-go zones, more Iraqis now drive between Sunni and Shiite areas for work, shopping or school, a few even after dark. In the most stable neighborhoods of Baghdad, some secular women are also dressing as they wish. Wedding bands are playing in public again, and at a handful of once shuttered liquor stores customers now line up outside in a collective rebuke to religious vigilantes from the Shiite Mahdi Army.

Questions remain, of course. Will this return to nomalcy outlast the surge? Once the troops leave, will Baghdad descend back into chaos?

Reading Between the Lines

I doubt Bush 41 intended it as such, but he seemed to be making a powerful statement against torture Sunday in a Fox News interview:

Wallace: “The President remembered the courage and humanity of American soldiers and he grew emotional.”

Bush: “My favorite picture is a picture of American soldiers surrounding a guy whose been in a foxhole, Iraqi soldier, and the American guy says, we’re not going to harm you, we’re American soldiers.” (fights back tears)

Bush: “…See, that side of the war never got — the fact that we treated those people with respect in spite of the fact they were the enemy, it’s really good.

Did you ever think you’d be nostalgic for GHWB? As Crooks and Liars points out, such views would have Bush 41 branded a coward if he were running for president today.

 

Reading Between the Lines

I doubt Bush 41 intended it as such, but he seemed to be making a powerful statement against torture Sunday in a Fox News interview:

Wallace: “The President remembered the courage and humanity of American soldiers and he grew emotional.”

Bush: “My favorite picture is a picture of American soldiers surrounding a guy whose been in a foxhole, Iraqi soldier, and the American guy says, we’re not going to harm you, we’re American soldiers.” (fights back tears)

Bush: “…See, that side of the war never got — the fact that we treated those people with respect in spite of the fact they were the enemy, it’s really good.

Did you ever think you’d be nostalgic for GHWB? As Crooks and Liars points out, such views would have Bush 41 branded a coward if he were running for president today.

 

Bush’s speech

He barely mentioned the failed reconciliation attempts within the Iraqi government, or how to reverse that trend. He warned of dire consequences stemming from an American withdrawl, but most of those scenarios have already unfolded. In short, Bush offered nothing new. Nor did he present a realistic portrayal of the challenges facing a divided Iraq. Whatever progress Petraeus engineered has been stunted by President Ziglar, er, Bush, who continues to rely upon cheap hucksterism to sell something no one’s buying, save for the true believers.

He’d have better luck pitching “Will and Grace” DVD’s on the streets of Kabul.

Bush’s speech

He barely mentioned the failed reconciliation attempts within the Iraqi government, or how to reverse that trend. He warned of dire consequences stemming from an American withdrawl, but most of those scenarios have already unfolded. In short, Bush offered nothing new. Nor did he present a realistic portrayal of the challenges facing a divided Iraq. Whatever progress Petraeus engineered has been stunted by President Ziglar, er, Bush, who continues to rely upon cheap hucksterism to sell something no one’s buying, save for the true believers.

He’d have better luck pitching "Will and Grace" DVD’s on the streets of Kabul.