Hillbot No Like Surprise

Piling on has never been so easy:

After her speech, Clinton accepted questions. But according to Grinnell College student Muriel Gallo-Chasanoff ’10, some of the questions from the audience were planned in advance. “They were canned,” she said. Before the event began, a Clinton staff member approached Gallo-Chasanoff to ask a specific question after Clinton’s speech. “One of the senior staffers told me what [to ask],” she said.

Clinton called on Gallo-Chasanoff after her speech to ask a question: what Clinton would do to stop the effects of global warming. Clinton began her response by noting that young people often pose this question to her before delving into the benefits of her plan.

But the source of the question was no coincidence—at this event “they wanted a question from a college student,” Gallo-Chasanoff said. She also noted that staffers prompted Clinton to call on her and another who had been approached before the event, although Clinton used her discretion to select questions and called on people who had not been prepped before hand. Some of the questions asked were confusing and clearly off-message.

I pose this question every now and then and will do so again: Why would anyone vote for this woman?

Hillbot No Like Surprise

Piling on has never been so easy:

After her speech, Clinton accepted questions. But according to Grinnell College student Muriel Gallo-Chasanoff ’10, some of the questions from the audience were planned in advance. “They were canned,” she said. Before the event began, a Clinton staff member approached Gallo-Chasanoff to ask a specific question after Clinton’s speech. “One of the senior staffers told me what [to ask],” she said.

Clinton called on Gallo-Chasanoff after her speech to ask a question: what Clinton would do to stop the effects of global warming. Clinton began her response by noting that young people often pose this question to her before delving into the benefits of her plan.

But the source of the question was no coincidence—at this event “they wanted a question from a college student,” Gallo-Chasanoff said. She also noted that staffers prompted Clinton to call on her and another who had been approached before the event, although Clinton used her discretion to select questions and called on people who had not been prepped before hand. Some of the questions asked were confusing and clearly off-message.

I pose this question every now and then and will do so again: Why would anyone vote for this woman?

Another Right-Wing Conspirator Unmasked

My friend Andisheh from Creative Loafing is doubly cursed. Grasping irony is bad enough — must he also have a sense of humor?

Andy’s come under fire from a humorless literalist for including a prominent anti-war activist in his rundown of Atlanta’s 11 Least Influential People.

Frankly, I think you and your publication owe Bobbie Paul an apology. Not only did you list her in a fool’s gallery, but you did it in the context of an action that constitutes about 1% of her contribution to the progressive community.

Do you have a clue who this woman is, or know anything about WAND?

Why don’t we just round out the list and put you as number 12? We could characterize you as the guy who likes to play writer.

You’re fucked now, Wolfowitz, er, Andy. The “progressive community” don’t play.

Of course he wasn’t mocking Paul. Inclusion on the list is something of an honor.

But that doesn’t matter to the terminally aggrieved likes of MelGX:

By the way, most of Bobbie’s people are letter writers. By Monday, your box should be full.

(I wish I had “people.” Write letters on my behalf, you!) 

Mel reminds me of those who bitch whenever TIME magazine names someone like Hitler “Man (Person, Person, sorry, I meant Person) of the Year.” Left or right, the professionally indignant are all the same.